The Arts Council presents a variety of events throughout the year, at the Coconino Center for the Arts and in other venues around Flagstaff. At the Center, you’ll experience art exhibitions, compelling concerts, and more. Around Flagstaff, we host performances on downtown Flagstaff’s Heritage Square, concerts in the idyllic setting at the Arboretum at Flagstaff, and Navajo Rug Auctions at the Museum of Northern Arizona.

Upcoming Events

Jun
10
Sat
Navajo Rug Auction 2017 @ Museum of Northern Arizona
Jun 10 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm

NavajoRugAuction_nslOver 300 original Navajo weavings are on the auction block in this fun, fast-paced event. Learn about Navajo weavings, meet the weavers and enjoy Navajo tacos and frybread. This event is held at the Museum of Northern Arizona on Saturday, June 11, 2016. There is no cost to attend and register for a bidder number.

Auction Preview: 9am-1pm
Auction: 2pm-6pm

2017 Navajo Rug Auction Catalogue

Our auctions are led by auctioneers from The R. B. Burnham & Co. Trading Post. Bruce Burnham and his family are well known for their work in trading Native art of the four corners area for five generations. Bruce has been a trader to the Navajo for over forty years and is also the auctioneer for The Hubbell Trading Post in Ganado, Arizona. He and his wife Virginia own and operate The Burnham Trading Post and Collector’s Gallery in Sanders, Arizona, in the Navajo new lands. The Burnham family is known for their encouragement of innovation and quality in Navajo Textiles and his expertise in buying, selling, and trading has earned him the respect of area collectors and peers nationwide.

Specialists and experts in the field of Native American art and Navajo weaving will be on site to identify handspun, hand-carded, and vintage pieces verses acrylic yarns to ensure quality items and prices. Information on how to evaluate and buy Navajo rugs will also be available.

Navajo Rug Auctions are an excellent opportunity to learn about Native American Art. Before the auction you can hold rugs in your hands and appreciate them up close. Detailed information and discussion about a specific piece, artist, and other aspects of the weavings will be available before and after the auction by experts in the field of Navajo weaving and culture. Auctions allow weavers and other artists to obtain an immediate and higher return for their work. The breadth of artists, styles, and bidding opportunities has made rug auctions an affordable way to purchase and collect high quality rugs. Rugs sell from twenty to a couple thousand dollars. Even if you do not buy anything, it is a great learning experience.

Navajo Rug AuctionIn order to enter your authentic Navajo weavings into the Auction, you must bring them to the Museum of Northern Arizona during the times listed below. Auction specialists will review your weavings and help you price them according to Auction history.

We will be accepting consignments for the Navajo Rug Auction the on the June 8th and 9th from 10am – 5pm at The Museum of Northern Arizona. 

For more information, contact us at (928) 779-2300.

2017 Navajo Rug Auction Catalogue

Aug
12
Sat
Members Preview: Hope + Trauma in a Poisoned Land @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Aug 12 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Chip Thomas

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land will explore the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. The show opens with a preview reception for Arts Council members on Saturday, August 12, 6-8pm. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

Artwork in the exhibition includes sculpture, painting, photography, installation art, textiles, film, virtual reality film, poetry, and performance. The participating artists are: Jeremy Singer, Venaya Yazzie, Helen Padilla, Anna Tsouhlarakis, Kim Hahn, Jane Lilly Benale, Esther Belin, Klee Benally, Mark Neumann, Elisa Rosales, Rebekah Nordstrom, Elbert Dayzie, Jocelyne Champagne Shiner, Jerrel Singer, Edie Dillon, Frederica Hall, Chip Thomas, Anne Collier, Malcolm Benally, Amy Martin, Pash Galbavy, Debra Edgerton, and the Death Convention Singers.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Read more about Hope + Trauma on the exhibition page here. The full event schedule for the exhibition, including lectures, a concert, and more, is posted on the left side column of this page.

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

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Aug
15
Tue
Exhibition Open: Hope + Trauma in a Poisoned Land @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Aug 15 @ 11:00 am – Oct 28 @ 5:00 pm

Exhibition Now Open: Tuesdays – Saturdays 11:00am-5:00pm

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition features work by 21 local and regional artists, including Navajo and non-Native artists. The show opened with a Preview Night for Arts Council members on Saturday, August 12, 6-8pm (see photos from the Preview here).

The exhibition is now open to the public through October 28, 2017, Tuesdays through Saturdays 11am-5pm.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

Artwork in the exhibition includes sculpture, painting, photography, installation art, textiles, film, virtual reality film, poetry, and performance. The participating artists are: Jeremy Singer, Venaya Yazzie, Helen Padilla, Anna Tsouhlarakis, Kim Hahn, Jane Lilly Benale, Esther Belin, Klee Benally, Mark Neumann, Elisa Rosales, Rebekah Nordstrom, Elbert Dayzie, Jocelyne Champagne Shiner, Jerrel Singer, Edie Dillon, Frederica Hall, Chip Thomas, Anne Collier, Malcolm Benally, Amy Martin, Pash Galbavy, Debra Edgerton, and the Death Convention Singers.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Chip Thomas

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Map of abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. Click on image for a larger view.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. See the column at left for a full listing of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

 

Sep
8
Fri
Sihasin + 2½ Minutes to Midnight @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Sep 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Special concert with Navajo rock band Sihasin – the opening act is the performance 2½ Minutes to Midnight, a collaborative performance that thematically ties into the Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land exhibition.

Sihasin: Dine’ word- to think with hope and assurance. The process of making critical affirmative action of thinking, planning, learning, becoming experienced and confident to adapt.

Brother and sister Jeneda and Clayson Benally of Blackfire from the Navajo (Dine’) Nation in Northern Arizona have created their own unique brand of music with bass and drums with Sihasin. They grew up protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional way of life. Their music reflects hope for equality, healthy and respectful communities and social and environmental justice.

Two and a Half Minutes & the Sky is Turning a Pale Yellow Green is a collaborative performance led by Flagstaff artist Frederica Hall. A collaborative performance between artist Clayson Benally, Jeneda Benally, Jones Benally, Margaret Dewar, Frederica Hall, Paul More, Brandon G Rawls, and Eriko Okugawa Starley. A creative journey of music, butho dance, poetry song, whispers from life stories new and ancient of the paths that are set before us. Which will we take? And where will we find ourselves in the dawn light?

This special opening act performance is by artists participating in Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition about the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. Following the twenty minute opening performance, Sihasin will perform a full concert.

Doors open at 6:30pm, with Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land open for viewing. The show begins at 7:30pm. Tickets are $10/advance, and $12/day of show.

Learn more about Sihasin >

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This event is part of Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Virtual Reality headset by Klee Benally, photo by Tom Alexander.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. Check back on this site in summer 2017 for a detailed schedule of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

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Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

Sep
23
Sat
Public Reception for Hope + Trauma in a Poisoned Land @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Sep 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land will explore the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. The show will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

This event is a special public reception during the Flagstaff Festival of Science. Everyone is welcome to come and view the exhibition, talk with participating artists, and hear from the exhibition creators about the show. There will be live music, yummy food, and a cash bar.

Following the reception at 8pm, The Accidentals will be featured in concert in the auditorium with special guest Jake Allen. Learn more about this concert >

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

Virtual reality headset by artist Klee Benally, photo by Tom Alexander.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. Check back on this site in summer 2017 for a detailed schedule of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

Detail of installation by artist Frederica Hall, photo by Tom Alexander.

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

 

Sep
26
Tue
The Environmental and Biological Impact of Uranium @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Sep 26 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

This special lecture presentation will explore the impacts of uranium mining and contamination on the environment and on the health of people and animals. There are over 500 abandoned uranium mines in the Navajo Nation alone – and many more throughout the western United States. What is the consequence of these mines on the land, and on the people downwind or downstream? This lecture, part of the 2017 Flagstaff Festival of Science, will explore these topics.

Our speakers are Tommy Rock and Jani Ingram (pictured). Ingram is Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Northern Arizona University (NAU), and the Principle Investigator of the Training Core at NAU for the Partnership of Native American Cancer Prevention (NACP), and director of Bridging Native American Students to Bachelor’s Degree (BRIDGES) program. Rock is a graduate student at NAU whose study revealed that water in the Sanders, Arizona, area was still contaminated from the Church Rock spill in 1979. He tested Sanders’ municipal water supply and found an average concentration of uranium of 50 parts per billion, exceeding federal limits. Rock’s findings shocked the community of Sanders, who were unaware of the contamination.

This event is part of Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma shares stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work is based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Virtual reality headset by artist Klee Benally, photo by Tom Alexander

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. Check back on this site in summer 2017 for a detailed schedule of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

 

 

Sep
29
Fri
SCI Talks @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Sep 29 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

SCI Talks is special event of short, TED Talk-style presentations produced by the Flagstaff Festival of Science. The event features four different science lectures on topics from ranging from mammoths to art, and plagues to education.

The topics and speakers for 2017 SCI Talks are:

Serendipity in Science: A Mammoth Project, presented by David Gillette Ph.D., Colbert Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology at Museum of Northern Arizona.

Tracking Worldwide Plague Transmission Across Thousands of Years Using Ancient DNA, presented by Jason Sahl,  Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University (NAU).

BASIS Senior Projects: High Achievement Meets Creativity, presented by Alicia Vaughan, Ph.D., Director of Student Affairs at BASIS Flagstaff.

Unfolding the Meaning of Art: Impact on the Maker, Viewer, and Community, presented by Ann Collier, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology at NAU.

Doors will open at 6:00pm, with the Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land exhibition open. The event begins at 6:30pm. SCI Talks are free and open to the public.


This event is part of Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Map of abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. Click on image for a larger view.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. See the listing of events on the column at left on this page.

 

Oct
11
Wed
Uranium & the Half-Life of Hope: Future of the Colorado Plateau Forum @ Museum of Northern Arizona
Oct 11 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Please note: this event is held at the Museum of Northern Arizona

The disturbing legacy of uranium mining on the Navajo Nation is well known to people who live near abandoned mines and mills. In 2005, the Nation banned uranium mining and milling on its nearly 30,000 square mile reservation, but it does not have the authority to ban the transportation of uranium on federal highways through its communities.

Aerial photo of the Kanab North Mine Site by Michael Collier

In 2012, when the U.S. Department of the Interior placed a 20-year ban on new uranium mining claims across one million acres of public lands adjacent to Grand Canyon, many felt that the era of uranium mining on the Colorado Plateau was drawing to a close. But in May 2015, Energy Fuels, Inc. began preparations to mine uranium on an existing claim at its Canyon Mine, a deposit on U.S. Forest Service land, just six miles from Tusayan and the busiest entrance to the Grand Canyon. The Havasupai Tribe’s lawsuit against the mine is awaiting a decision by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

There are also plans to drill for uranium on Arizona State Trust Lands, which are exempt from the federal ban, including the Wate Mine just off the main road into Havasupai. And a proposal for a 1.7-million-acre national monument designed to permanently protect the Grand Canyon watershed from uranium mining failed to be enacted in the final days of the Obama administration.

So what is the future of uranium mining on the Colorado Plateau? We will hear from educators, political leaders and activists who are engaged directly with this question. More importantly, we want to hear from you!

Please note: this event is held at the Museum of Northern Arizona

The event is free, but registration is required to attend:

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The Future of the Colorado Plateau Forum series is presented by the Museum of Northern Arizona and Grand Canyon Trust. Generous support is provided by Coconino County, the Geo Family Foundation, the Landscape Conservation Initiative at NAU, City of Flagstaff BBB Revenues, and the Flagstaff Arts Council.


This event is associated Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition at the Coconino Center for the Arts that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

Oct
17
Tue
I-Witness: Artist Talk with Pash Galbavy @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Oct 17 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Mask maker and performance artist Pash Galbavy (Sedona) uses masks and movement to share her personal and archetypal experience of participating in Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land. Masks of Privilege, Fear, Compassion and more play parts in this story of awakening to the haunting reality that exists right outside of Flagstaff, and which affects the health of everyone, including most directly those living on the Navajo Reservation.

Doors open at 6:00pm to view the exhibition. Talk begins at 6:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Artist Statement: My artistic passion and goal is to express common human experience in a viscerally impactful way using masks and movement. The body is a wonderful tool because expressing with it tends to bypass logical thinking and go directly to viewers’ core. I love working with masks because they are iconic. They rise beyond the personal into the archetypal, and visually illustrate recognizable characters and emotions. I am especially interested in using masks to animate inner parts of the psyche that are reflected on the larger world stage.

This event is part of Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma will share stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work will be based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Virtual reality headset by artist Klee Benally, photo by Tom Alexander

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. Check back on this site in summer 2017 for a detailed schedule of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

 

 

Oct
24
Tue
Cultural and Psychological Impact of Uranium @ Coconino Center for the Arts
Oct 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

This special lecture presentation will explore the cultural and psychological impacts of uranium mining and contamination on Navajo people. There are over 500 abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation. Navajo people in some communities have learned that their water has been contaminated for years without their knowledge. As recently as 2015, the school district in Sanders, Arizona, had to shut off the water in their schools. Many Navajos have seen loved ones suffer from illnesses as a result of radiation exposure. This presentation will explore how these kinds of traumatic experiences impact people’s culture and way of life.

Speakers for this presentation are Navajo Nation member and NAU graduate student in Educational Psychology Davonna Blackhorse, and Ann Collier, Ph.D. (pictured), Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology at NAU.

This event is part of Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, the new exhibition that explores the impact of uranium mining on Navajo lands and people. The art exhibition will feature work by more than two dozen artists, including Navajo and Native artists. It will be open to the public August 15 – October 28, 2017.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land, photo by Tom Alexander

Through the participating artists, Hope and Trauma shares stories and perspectives from Navajo people of their experiences due to radiation-related impacts to their bodies, their land, their water, their animals, and the natural materials and objects they use in their everyday lives. Art work is based on a series of interactions, shared stories, and educational programs that took place in Cameron, Arizona, and in Flagstaff, in October 2016. Artists attended a four-day intensive education program which immersed them in the landscape where uranium mining and contamination has occurred on the Navajo Nation. They learned from Navajo community members, scientists, health care professionals, mental health professionals, and other experts about the impacts of uranium mining.

This blockbuster exhibition is funded in part through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

From 1944 to 1986, nearly 30 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands. At the time, Navajo miners and residents were not informed of the health impacts of working in the mines, or of the impact on their lands. Many Navajo people have died of kidney failure and cancer from conditions linked to uranium contamination. Research from the CDC shows uranium in babies born now.

Virtual reality headset by artist Klee Benally, photo by Tom Alexander

More than one thousand abandoned uranium mines are located on the Navajo reservation in northeastern Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Hundreds are located within fifty miles of Flagstaff near and in Cameron, Arizona. The federal government recently agreed to commit over $1 billion to clean up 94 abandoned mines on the Navajo Nation. The estimated cost to clean up all abandoned mines is likely too large to calculate.

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is a partnership between the Cameron Chapter House of the Navajo Nation, the Flagstaff Arts Council, University of New Mexico Community Environmental Health Program, and Northern Arizona University.

Project partners followed the established model for art exhibitions that began with Fires of Change. That exhibition also featured a week-long training for participating artists that covered forest and fire ecology, giving artists education insight into the increase in size and frequency of wildfires in the American southwest, with a focus on Northern Arizona. This process ensures that participating artists are educated and informed about the complex issue of uranium mining before they created artwork for the exhibition.

Hope and Trauma will feature several educational events to be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. Check back on this site in summer 2017 for a detailed schedule of events.

Read the Arizona Republic’s in-depth story on uranium mining >

Funded in part by a grant from:

Hope and Trauma in a Poisoned Land is generously supported by:

MonteVistaLogoWeb      nau

freeman-law-full-logo-color

 

 

Oct
25
Wed
Film Showing: Hot Water @ NAU Campus in The International Pavilion (Building 50A)
Oct 25 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

This film showing is on the NAU Campus in The International Pavilion (Building 50A). Part of the Better World Film Series.

When you were growing up, how many people did you know who had cancer?

How many do you know today?

Filmmakers Lizabeth Rogers and Kevin Flint travel to South Dakota following a story about uranium contamination—only to discover that the problem flows much farther and runs much deeper than they could have imagined.

Three years and thousands of miles later, Hot Water tells the story of those impacted by uranium mining, atomic testing, nuclear energy and the subsequent contamination that runs through our air, soil and—even more dramatically—our water.

From Fat Man and Little Boy to Duck and Cover, we believed it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic age.

Hot Water offers this question: Are the thirty-eight million people in the American Southwest aware that their water supply is filtered through 16 million tons of radioactive waste lying on the banks of the Colorado River?

Our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals known to man, and the subsequent health and environmental damage will take generations and 100’s of billions of dollars to heal.

Follow Liz, Kevin and their team as they travel the American West and expose uranium mining and our nuclear legacy for what it is, and for what it’s left behind.

The film is followed by a Q&A with director Lizabeth Rogers and Navajo historian Jennifer Rose Denetdale. In Partnership with: Sustainable Communities Program, with funding support from Arizona Humanities.
Jun
9
Sat
Navajo Rug Auction 2018 @ Museum of Northern Arizona
Jun 9 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm